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As MacBeth did with internal monologues and soliloquies, how do you convey guilt, or guilty feelings, in modern cinema? - Question/Answer Now Playing


As MacBeth did with internal monologues and soliloquies, how do you convey guilt, or guilty feelings, in modern cinema?

Sep 24, 2010

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As MacBeth did with internal monologues and soliloquies, how do you convey guilt, or guilty feelings, in modern cinema? - Question/Answer Q & A Discussion


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at Aug 26, 2012 - 12:39 PM
How about the scene in Fargo where William H Macy flees the interview?
henrymann: The easy way out
at Sep 26, 2010 - 5:14 PM
I think an easy way to portray a character’s guilt (other than VO) is to show the character’s inability to enjoy the benefits that flow from the act that caused the guilt, e.g. in Broadway Danny Rose the Mia Farrow character was unable to enjoy the money and success that flowed from her betrayal of Danny Rose. (Then there are the poor souls who try to make amends by supporting altruistic causes only to find that it makes their guilt all the more pernicious.)
ellen: Guilt
at Sep 24, 2010 - 5:35 PM
When I've felt guilty, I construct a fantasy (lie) and after telling that lie, often leave clues so I get caught. I've done this in very small issues where the other person would not have been angry about what I did or larger issues, but the constructing of a lie is the telling sign of my guilt.

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