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When your story has a tragic ending, how do you keep the audience from leaving the theatre devastated? - Question/Answer Now Playing


When your story has a tragic ending, how do you keep the audience from leaving the theatre devastated?

Jul 14, 2011

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When your story has a tragic ending, how do you keep the audience from leaving the theatre devastated? - Question/Answer Q & A Discussion


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Richard wrote
at Jul 20, 2011 - 5:20 PM
Watch Seven with Brad Pitt and Morgan Freeman. I left the theater shocked and devastated. Since then I have viewed the movie a number of times, and I stll find myself trying to imagine what might have become of the Pitt character after the end of the on screen story. Did he get his mind right and return to the force? Or was he a basket case for the rest of his life? For me, this is the Holy Grail of story telling--creating a story that not only makes the audience feel something, but keeps them revisiting and thinking about the story and its characters long after the they've read/seen the work. 
Richard wrote
at Jul 20, 2011 - 5:20 PM
Watch Seven with Brad Pitt and Morgan Freeman. I left the theater shocked and devastated. Since then I have viewed the movie a number of times, and I stll find myself trying to imagine what might have become of the Pitt character after the end of the on screen story. Did he get his mind right and return to the force? Or was he a basket case for the rest of his life? For me, this is the Holy Grail of story telling--creating a story that not only makes the audience feel something, but keeps them revisiting and thinking about the story and its characters long after the they've read/seen the work. 
sunbird1942: 1969 - Joe
at Jul 16, 2011 - 6:14 PM
I remember the folks coming out of the movie "Joe" totally stunned, speechless and walking as if they'd been hit by a pole axe. In retrospect, the writer and the actors (and the director) impacted the viewers - certainly not a bad thing. I also remember the sprited conversation my group had after we left the theater and regained our senses.

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