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If the inciting incident is the death of a loved one, can the protagonist’s object of desire be to get that person back? - Question/Answer Now Playing


If the inciting incident is the death of a loved one, can the protagonist’s object of desire be to get that person back?

Dec 29, 2011

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If the inciting incident is the death of a loved one, can the protagonist’s object of desire be to get that person back? - Question/Answer Q & A Discussion


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Gthl111: My thoughts
at May 10, 2016 - 10:23 PM
Well of course. Just look at the myth of Orpheus and Evrydia. When the man Orpheus looked away his wife Evrydia stepped on a snake, got bit and died. The rest of the story is about Orpheus travelling down to the underworld to get her back. That is his object of his desire.

But today would not be taken so literal. More like what Mckee said about how people look to replace each other. Just look at Pshycho and what Norman Bates did to cope with the death of his mother. To get his mother back, he "Became" his mother. But it depends on yourself on what will happen.

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